Is Late Money A Factor In Greyhound Handicapping?

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Late money is why the payoff you get isn’t always the payoff you think you’re going to get when you cash a ticket at the greyhound track. You put down a bet on a dog that’s at 3-1. It wins. You look up at the board before you go to cash your ticket and are surprised to see that it’s now at 9-5. What happened?

Well, the late money jumped on the dog and bet it down to where you’re not going to get as much as you thought you’d get. Of course, a winning ticket is still a nice thing, but what if you bet more than you get back? If you boxed the dog with another dog in a quiniela and its low odds brought down the odds on the quiniela, you could actually win and still lose money on the race.

So, should you wait until the absolute last minute before you make your bets so that the late money won’t lower the price after you make your bet? No. You should bet dogs that you think are contenders at odds that make sense. There’s not a lot you can do about the effect late money has on the payoffs.

However, if you notice that the odds on a dog are lower than they should be, you might want to wait until you see if the odds are going to get really low as all the “me-too” bettors jump on it. This is especially likely to happen in a race where there are no real standouts, but gradually one dog’s odds get lower and lower than all of the other dogs’ odds.

People in crowds tend to follow the leaders. If the leaders like a dog in a race where most people don’t know who to like, watch for it to become a bigger favorite than it deserves to be. Bet accordingly and expect that the late money will very likely bet it down to nothing.

If you haven’t looked at Bet America lately, or if you’ve never considered it, give it a look. Right now, they’re having a special sign-up bonus where they’ll match your initial deposit up to $300! That’s $300 worth of bets free! Their new handicapping pages have taken the place of programs for me. Try handicapping some races with them on paper and see how you do.

If you don’t want to pay for programs, but want as much information as you need to pick winners, Bet America is the best Advanced Wagering Deposit option online.

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Race Shapes Can Help You Pick Winners at the Greyhound Races

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(This is an excerpt from Book 2 of my Greyhound Handicapping Series which is available in paperback or Kindle on Amazon. The complete series – Books 1-6 – has 18 mini systems, 120 articles and links to greyhound handicapping resources. Read the complete series for free with Kindle Unlimited.)

Before I even think about handicapping a race or a dog in that race, I like to look at the shape of the race. What’s that? Well, for me, it’s what the race will look like as it unfolds. Will it be a race where early speed is a big factor? Are there a lot of dogs with trouble lines for the turns, which means that there could be a lot of them flying the turns or knocking other dogs off the turns? Is it a higher grade race, a lower grade, or is it a puppy race? The grade of the race really affects the shape of the race, especially in M and the lower grades.

So, to find the shape of a race, here’s what I do. I look at the dogs first, but only in a general sort of way. I look at their names to see if I know any of them from previous races. Although I don’t follow every dog at every track, of course, I do keep track of some of them, even if it’s just to know their running style or little quirks. (Knowing that a dog never wins or always wins from a certain post position, is like finding gold in the street, for example.)

Next, I look for early speed, because that is so often a factor in races. I look at the Break and 1/8th calls for each dog and also look to see whether they close at the end of the race or lose position. I circle the fast breaks and 1/8th calls and the last call for closers. Then I look for trouble lines in their comments. If I find too many dogs with trouble lines, I pass the race. It’s impossible to handicap races where more than a couple of dogs will probably get into trouble or cause trouble for the other dogs, so for me, the shape of those races is a big fat zero, because that’s probably what I’ll win on them.

If the race looks playable, I handicap the other factors that I use and this gets into the other shape that matters in racing – the shape of the dog. Is it in form? Has it been running up to its best potential? Is it in the winner’s circle at least a third of the time if it’s in the higher grades and in the quiniela at least half the time? Has it just dropped down or is it moving up? If it’s moving up, has it run in this grade before and, if so, how did it do? This will tell you if the shape of the dog fits the shape of the race. Once you get used to doing this for every race, it gets to be automatic and doesn’t take much time at all.

If you haven’t looked at Bet America lately, or if you’ve never considered it, give it a look. Right now, they’re having a special sign-up bonus where they’ll match your initial deposit up to $300! That’s $300 worth of bets free! Their new handicapping pages have taken the place of programs for me. Try handicapping some races with them on paper and see how you do.

If you don’t want to pay for programs, but want as much information as you need to pick winners, Bet America is the best Advanced Wagering Deposit option online.

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