Win At the Dog Track: A Tale of Two Gamblers

Joe and Bob both go to one of my favorite tracks. I see them there all the time, sitting at a table near the window that looks out over the finish line. You’d know the track if I mentioned it, but its name doesn’t matter. I’m sure there are plenty of “Joe’s” and “Bob’s” at your favorite track.

Bob drinks coffee by the gallon and smokes outside between races. He’s a nervous kind of guy. Always moving around, tapping his pen on the table, clearing his throat, tapping his foot. He’d drive Joe crazy if they hadn’t been friends for so long that Joe doesn’t even notice it any more.

While Bob flips back and forth through his program, looking for really good-looking winners, Joe carefully and methodically handicaps his program with a system that he’s been using for years. It hasn’t made him rich, but it helps him consistently pick winners, quinielas and sometimes trifectas. It’s the reason he goes home a little richer at the end of the day.

Bob, on the other hand, doesn’t believe in systems. He thinks they’re all rip-offs and scams. He likes to handicap the program himself. After all, he’s been going to the dog races for twenty years, so who knows more about how to pick winners than he does?

Well, apparently, a lot of people do, because they take Bob’s money every time he goes to the track. Sometimes, he makes a few dollars, but over the long haul, Bob loses from $20 to $75 dollars on most of his track trips. He’s a loser and a lousy handicapper, but he’ll never admit it.

When he gets home and his wife asks him if he won anything, he always says, “I won a little.” He’s lying and his wife knows it, but she loves him and doesn’t give him a hard time. She wishes he’d get a clue about how to pick dogs though, because she knows he hates losing.

Joe’s wife knows that he wins more than he loses, because he tells her what he lost and what he won. He talks a little about the dogs that made him money that day, but only a little, because he doesn’t want to bore her to tears. He knows she just wants to know if he won or lost, not every little detail.

Joe’s wife was a little doubtful back when Joe bought a lot of handicapping books and reports, but now she’s glad that Joe did. It gives him an advantage that the other bettors don’t have. Bob’s wife wishes Bob would get a clue and find someone who could help him figure out the dog races.

Joe and Bob are both smart, sharp and determined to make money at the dog track. One of them will make money at the track, and the other one could if he’d get a winning strategy for greyhound handicapping. If you’re like Joe, you know what I’m talking about. If you’re like Bob, what are you going to do about winning at the dog track?

This entry was posted in Greyhound handicapping and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Win At the Dog Track: A Tale of Two Gamblers

  1. big Bobby says:

    help me win something

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.